John Coker, LTD - Est. 1971

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This well decorated Basaltine Ware by Frank Beardmore & Co. was made to mimick Wedgwood and the decoration shows the national shield of Canada. The pitcher is black with a basalt feeling on the exterior and the interior is slick with a dark olive green slip.
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A Siamese figure is bright cut into the black enamel of the drop portion of the earring. The earrings have a good weight but would not pull an ear down.
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Stuart Nye was a major maker of hand hammered jewelry in the Southern US starting during the late 1940s and continuing currently. His style was making good high quality pieces, hand hammered or unusually textured finishes and signing on the back with a dogwood blossom and his initials NYE worked in the petals. This hair clip would date to the late 40s, and could not be in better condition. The original clasp is in good working condition, and the shape is almost a crescent making it easy to place a large amount of hair and secure it.
In years gone by, long before recycling became fashionable, ladies decided that it was best to put single objects to multiple use. Hence collars that went from coat to coat or suit to coat. This fur collar appears to be mink and even still has the ends for fastening around the neck. In good condition, it is ready to use on a retro or vintage outfit and would add some real pizzaz on that special fashion.
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The elegance of the department store presentation is well displayed here. The lady is elegant and the fur coat sensual. Ruth Sampson was a well known illustrator and artist in the Cleveland, Ohio area, she drew for Engel & Fetzer Department Store, and this was one of her fur drawings for an ad.
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The Edwin Knowles Company made some of Americas favorite kitchenware. The Marion pattern features cheery floral decorations against fluted or ribbed backgrounds on yellow. The pieces appear to be mint and the colors are very muted.
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Set of 12 probably handmade silver salt cellars in the shape of a small punch bowl with beaded edges. Still in the original box that has the seller of J. W. Tucker & Co., San Francisco, California stamped on the original satin top (hinge separation to the box), this is an unusual set to find all 12 of the salt sellers in the original box and none lost. There is no makers mark, but all evidence appears to be silver, and from the classical style, it would be a good guess to say about 1850-1870. The graduated and shaped base resembles a punch bowl and literally, around the edge of the top, there is almost a dental style molding on the outer edge. This is an outstanding opportunity for a silver collector to acquire a matched set of 12 19th century salt cellars in an original leather covered box.
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Okay, its 5:00 somewhere in the world, and time to start happy hour. You get your cocktail shaker and notice the neat shell motif in the center with a rope gadrooning around the top portion, the tight handle, the pull out lid and screw away drink strainer. A Martini never tasted so good, nor anything else for that matter. The plating is in good condition, the piece could use a polish up but this may be the way you inherited this from your Grandparents, after all, this is heirloom silver. This just has a quality feel to the hand. Does anyone know where the olives are?
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A very pretty, nice size English sugar bowl that unfortunately has a mended handle and a chip on the lid. The transfer wear is well done and covers the entire bowl in a floral, fruit and country scene. The bowl shows a brown urn with flowers under a tree and a thatched roof house and perhaps mill building in the background. There is a good diamond pattern geometric border on the edge. The chip on the exterior of the lid does show, but with all the vine and fruit decoration, it is almost not noticeable.
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A Colonial Dames of Tennessee project this 1964 paperback book shows some 146 pages of text and photos. The black and white illustrations were few but the information on the sitters in the paintings would now be invaluable to historians as the owners have recorded known information close to 40 years ago. This is a serious reference book for art historians.